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Savannah Area Attractions

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Geogia Historical Society

Georgia Historical Society (GHS) is the premier independent statewide institution responsible for collecting, examining, and teaching Georgia history. GHS houses the oldest and most distinguished collection of materials related exclusively to Georgia history in the nation. 

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fort mcallisterFort McAllister Historic Park
Gay Savannah Attractions



Located on the bank of the Great Ogeechee River south of Savannah, this park is the home of the best preserved earthwork fortification of the Confederacy. The sand and mud earthworks were attacked seven times by Union ironclads, but did not fall until captured in 1864 by Gen. William T. Sherman during his infamous “March to the Sea.” Nestled among giant live oaks and beautiful salt marsh, this park is a quiet location for camping, hiking, fishing and picnicking. The park’s Civil War museum features an interior designed to resemble a bombproof, containing exhibits and artifacts, a video and gift shop. Three cottages sit on stilts at the marsh edge, surrounded by palm trees and palmettos. The campground is bordered by tidal Redbird Creek, a boat ramp and nature trail.

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ralph m gilbertRalph M. Gilbert Civil Rights Museum
Gay Savannah Attractions

The Ralph Mark Gilbert Civil Rights Museum, recently named "Georgia's Best New History Museum" by the Georgia Journal, is named in honor of the late Dr. Ralph Mark Gilbert. The father of Savannah's modern day Civil Rights Movement and fearless National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) leader was known for much more than his outspoken campaigns for civil rights. He was a nationally known orator, pulpiteer and playwright, producing religious dramas (passion plays) throughout the country.

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ships of the seaShips of the Sea - Maritime Museum
Gay Savannah Attractions

The Scarbrough House is the elegant setting for the Museum's collection of ship models, paintings and maritime antiques. It was built in 1819 for one of the principal owners of the Savannah, the first steamship to cross the Atlantic Ocean. Scarbrough's architect, William Jay from England, created one of the earliest examples of the Greek Revival in the South. Used as a public school from the 1870's, the mansion was abandoned for twenty years and then restored by Historic Savannah Foundation in the 1970's. After another period of neglect, Ships of the Sea Maritime Museum restored the house again in 1996-97, building a new roof based on a documented William Jay design, adding a new rear portico and enlarging the garden.

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tybee lighthouseTybee Island Lighthouse
Gay Savannah Attractions

Ordered by General James Oglethorpe, Governor of the 13th colony, in 1732, the Tybee Island Light Station has been guiding mariners safe entrance into the Savannah River for over 270 years. The Tybee Island Light Station is one of America's most intact having all of its historic support buildings on its five-acre site. Rebuilt several times the current lightstation displays its 1916 day mark with 178 stairs and a First Order Fresnel lens (nine feet tall).

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king-tisdaleKing-Tisdell Cottage
Gay Savannah Attractions

The King-Tisdell Cottage is an African-American heritage museum named for its African-American owners, Eugene and Sarah King, and Sarah King and Robert Tisdell. This museum of African-American Savannah and the Sea Islands is owned and operated by the King-Tisdell Cottage Foundation, which also owns and operates the Negro Heritage Trail Tours and the Beach Institute on the corner of Price and Harris Streets.

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fort pulaski

Fort Pulaski National Monument
Gay Savannah Attractions

The Battle for Fort Pulaski in April 1862 marked a turning point in military history. It featured the first significant use of rifled cannons in combat. These accurate, long-range weapons shattered Fort Pulaski's walls from over a mile away. After thirty-hours of bombardment, the fort surrendered. The battle surprised military strategists worldwide, signaling the end of masonry fortifications.
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wormsloeWormsloe Historic Site
Gay Savannah Attractions

A breathtaking avenue lined with live oaks leads to the tabby ruins of Wormsloe, the colonial estate constructed by Noble Jones, one of Georgia's first settlers. Jones was an English physician and carpenter who carved out an even wider career in the colonial wilderness. He came to Savannah with James Oglethorpe in 1733 and commanded a company of Marines charged with Georgia's coastal defense. Jones served as constable, Indian agent, surveyor (laying out New Ebenezer and Augusta) and member of the Royal Council. He was also one of few original settlers to survive hunger, plague, Indians, Spaniards and a new environment.

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mighty eighthMighty Eighth Air Force Museum
Gay Savannah Attractions



On January 28, 1942, fifty-three days after the infamous attack on Pearl Harbor, the 8th Air Force was officially activated in the National Guard Armory on Bull Street in Savannah, Georgia.

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andrew lowAndrew Low House
Gay Savannah Attractions

The classically designed Andrew Low House sits on the southwest trust lot on Lafayette Square in the beautiful port city of Savannah, Georgia. The square was named after a Revolutionary War hero and the trust lot was the former site of the old jail.

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